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 Pediatrics Match Information  




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Author94 Posts
  #21

Ok, this is my point of view from the questions asked:
angel: I did not have any Peds research experience. My research experience was in adult ID. If you're still in med school, what I would advice is the following:
Start studying early for your exams. It took me a good 3 years to clear the 3 of them, and some places wouldn't accept my application due to my grad date. Of course, you still have a lot of options (there are about 200 peds program out there) but if you wanna take your pick, apply within 2 years of graduating.
Try to do good in the exams. You don't have to get 99, but if you score above 90 you are in good shape. It is really doable. I wasn't really top of my med school class or anything like it (actually was more like average-lower tier of my class).
Account for your time since you graduated. Try to get like a nominal or half time job that allows you to show that you've been practicing medicine and just not studying. Some programs like research better, some that you've been practicing medicine continuosly. Try to get into some research or get something published (I didn't had any publications).
On a personal note, if you can afford Kaplan courses (for what you need to be obscenely rich), I've heard from a couple of friends who did score well, and the prep time is shorter than if you do it yourself. This of course needs to be carefully thought, because you're gonna be spending a LOT of money taking the exams, doing USCE, applying and interviewing.
Peds I believe in general is less competitive than IM. Problem is some people apply to other specialties and use Peds as a second choice, so this might make it somewhat tougher. But with a good profile, you do stand a fairly good chance to match.
Paheli: There are several comercial lists or even free lists of what programs are IMG friendly. This should be your main objective. Apply to programs where IMG apply (obviously programs that IV IMG or have IMG residents come first). Unless you have the CASL, Cali programs are left out. Main states that have IMG friendly programs are NY, NJ, TX, FL, IL, MI, PA. There many other isolated programs as well. Look into their webpages. Nobody is gonna tell we do not IV IMG. Try to see whether you see IMG among the residents, or if you heard from somebody who IV or matched there. I made a preliminary list, and compared it with a list which I bought from a website, and then refined it with each program criteria for applicants. I emailed and phoned a lot of programs during July and August to find out this.
About finding which programs are malignant, well there are several approaches:
Direct information from a friend/grad from your school or country who is a housestaff in the program.
During the IV, if they do not give you alone time with the residents (not the chief residents only), this is a major red flag. Talk to the INTERNS, they'll tell what your life is gonna be like.
Get some info about the PD. If you don't get enthusiast comments from the residents, something might not be good. Get a feeling of the PD during the IV. Does the PD seem concerned with the residents, or are they a bit on their own?.
I also read some program comments on www.scutwork.com, but several reviews are outdated. Don't rely to heavily on this.
If there are several IMGs in the program, this doesn't imply it is friendly. If there are no US grads in the program, there might be a reason behind it. Is it because of the city, the expenses, the quality of the program or the workload/work environment?
Some programs take very good care of their applicants (nice program coordinator, schedule well managed, several interviewers, face time with PD, lunch with the residents, nice tour of the hospital, even sometimes free hotel stay and dinner with the residents the night before). The way I see it, if someone takes good care of their applicants they are more likely to take good care of their residents.
On the other side, I agree that 42% percent of succcess matching is not a great number, but this does not take into account the amount of people who accept out of match positions (which are almost fully IMGs).
This is my point of view. Would love to hear some comments from other people. Unfortunately, sometimes we IMGs tend to see each other as competition, and this causes that information is not always shared among us. Sadly, this is sometimes reflected during interviews (i had a couple of funny situations regarding this last point during IV seasons).

Anyway, GL to everyone for the upcoming Match. Sincerely!





  #22

Thanks a lot Cargue.



  #23

I am a graduate of 1999. I did one year of house job in Neonatology and 2 years of private practice in my home country. Since 2002,I was a stay at home wife and mom as family gained precedence over career and it was never a good time to take the exams. In june 2005 I just started as I had to start somewhere.

I did not have a good network of friends or any college seniors who could guide me.But the turning point in my preparation was going to a medical school library where I met other people preparing fro USMLE EXAMS and took full advantage of it. My scores are 93/99/91/cs pass all in first attempts.Having a compatible study partner makes a lot of difference.
For people interested in Pediatrics, any kind of pediatric experience is a must..The applicants are two kinds: Fresh young graduates , or pediatricians with completed post graduate training in their own country.For in between candidates like me, US clinical experience in any pediatrics sub speciality adds tremendous value.

As Mukho said,ICU observership comes easy than floors. I did NICU observership in two places and got letters but I waived my right,so I don't know what was written in those letters. My best advice is don't leave any gaps in your resume. Even though I had decent scores ,Green card and US experience,my application was rejected by so many programs due to the 5 year gap. Some programs had asked me to explain the gap after seeing my application, if they found the explanaton unsatisfactory did not give me an invite.

I had 16 interviews 8 university and 8 community programs,matched with University program in Virginia.




  #24

Hi again, everyone. Does anyone have any info about Fellowship opportunities in Peds? How competitive are they? What's the procedure to apply, or is it too early to ask y'all?

Thanks.



  #25

Man, I wish this was a FM thread rolling eyes



  #26

Hey, p4a99. You're an FM guy? All you have to do is start a similar thread! Good luck!smiling face

[By the history of your avatars, I always thought you were a babies person. ]



  #27

Naaa, I like family m but the problem is with the low $$$ and not many interesting subspecialties rolling eyes ... screw this paying system ... not enough primary care docs in the country but they still insist on paying specialists double $$$ ... how stupid!



  #28

Well, Peds is primary care too. And only slightly better paid than FM. Though significantly better choice as far a Fellowship is concerned. And a lifetime of caring for babies.......can't wait!! nodgrinsmiling face



  #29

paheli wrote:
Hi again, everyone. Does anyone have any info about Fellowship opportunities in Peds? How competitive are they? What's the procedure to apply, or is it too early to ask y'all?

Thanks.


Hi. I didn't want this qn buried in the previous page. Thanks for any answers!



  #30

Maybe because you still dont have any of your own sticking out tongue



  #31

ok...this is what i know of fellowships...knowledge still in infancy...
most fellowships require you to apply in the middle of ur second year except critical care and emergency med.
applications are usually thru individual forms..available from the websites of the program or on emailing them...some can be applied thru ERAS and most match thru NRMP (list available on site) but some like neonatology, I think (not sure), dont use NRMP and selection is insti based.
High in demand are EM, Cardio, rheumato....lower are crit care....
I think once u get into residency the IMG vs AMG is diluted and chances of getting into really good institutes increases....while CV matters, research does count, some say step 3 score counts (but dont think thats for peds) ...but what really counts is who calls for u where...so working hard in residency and making a good impression must be important...
well I am still working at increasing my fundas...hopefully more contributions will come in
praying4a99--peds is the ultimate primary care mannod...but FM ppl get loads of exposure in peds...all the best for FM.


  #32

praying4a99 wrote:
Maybe because you still dont have any of your own sticking out tongue


sticking out tongue back at ya!




  #33

mukho, thanks for your detailed answer as usual. I really appreciate your help, I can't say how much!

P.S. As an aside, any idea where you're interested in F'ship?



  #34

torn between EM and Critical care, but me thinks crit care will winsmiling face


  #35

Mukho, EM or critical care eirther one, I'm sure you will be exceptional doctor



  #36

I think I'm switching to osb/gyne, guys. I'm torn between many specialties. I seriosly liked many specialties so far. I know lit's better than liking nothing but i can't stop thinking !



  #37

angel^Doctor wrote:
I think I'm switching to osb/gyne, guys. I'm torn between many specialties. I seriosly liked many specialties so far. I know lit's better than liking nothing but i can't stop thinking !


shocked, angel!! Traitor!! Ok, just kidding, you can deal with the Moms, and pass on the babies to us. I'm sure you'll excel in whichever dept is lucky to have you. nodsmiling face

Mukho, so what's the difference b/w ER and Critical Care. Is the difference restricted to ER seeing patients being rushed in to the hosp, while CC is all about in-patients? Or is there more difference?



  #38

paheli wrote:


shocked, angel!! Traitor!! Ok, just kidding, you can deal with the Moms, and pass on the babies to us. I'm sure you'll excel in whichever dept is lucky to have you. nodsmiling face




ya exactly, I'll still be in touch with babies, that's what i was telling my freindswink

Thanks for your nice comment smiling face

i guess i have plenty of time to a make up my mind! I'm sure I'll get over it and my loyalty to peds will win



  #39

angel^Doctor wrote:
I'm sure I'll get over it and my loyalty to peds will win


confusedshaking head, dude, quit confusing me. And, erm, yourself. wink



  #40

Paheli, Angel, P4a99, what small ambitions you have disapproval Have a look at one of the great dreams of future successful doctors out there:

"Fortunately, myself and others in my med school have decided that medical school is not about helping people. The poor are disgusting and only depress you. Although, personally I think they exist to make you feel better about your lifestyle. Any who, my class and I have decided that medical careers should be about other things, like a good comfortable lifestyle, power, influence and respect. These make you feel good about yourself and help with picking up chicks at a bar. That’s why, when I graduate medical school, I hope to whore myself out to an insurance company and become one of those ridiculously well-paid doctors who make extra bonuses when they deny patients access to chemotherapy."

Patients are good hands nod


rolling eyes HOW SICK !







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